Area Information

Sun City Center, Kings Point, Wimauma, Apollo Beach and Ruskin Florida

Sun City Center, Florida

Location in Hillsborough County and the state of Florida

Coordinates: 27°42′48″N 82°21′35″WCoordinates: 27°42′48″N 82°21′35″W
Country United States
State Florida
County Hillsborough
Founded 1961[1]
Area
 • Total 12.8 sq mi (33.1 km2)
 • Land 12.5 sq mi (32.4 km2)
 • Water 0.3 sq mi (0.7 km2)
Elevation 49 ft (15 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 19,258
 • Density 1,275.1/sq mi (493.1/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP Codes 33573
Area code(s) 813
FIPS code 12-27319[2]
GNIS feature ID 1853255[3]
Website http://www.suncitycenter.org/

Sun City Center is an unincorporated census-designated place located in southern Hillsborough County, Florida, United States. It is located south of Tampa and north of Sarasota on I-75. As of the 2010 census, the population was 19,258. The Zip Code serving the community is 33573.

Description

Sun City Center is an age-restricted community, which consists of single-family dwellings, duplexes, townhouses, and apartment buildings. It has its own hospital and several nursing home facilities. It is legal to drive golf carts on the wide, palm-lined streets during daylight hours and most shopping has special parking slots for same. There are about 20 golf courses, various hobby shops, an outdoor and two indoor pools in the main clubhouse area. There are clubs for almost any interest or hobby, including ham radio, computers, sewing, cards, investments, and dancing.

Geography

Sun City Center is located at 27°42′48″N 82°21′35″W (27.713353, -82.359659)[4].

According to the United States Census Bureau, the community has a total area of 12.8 square miles (33 km2), of which, 12.5 square miles (32 km2) of it is land and 0.3 square miles (0.78 km2) of it (2.19%) is water.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1970 2,143
1980 5,605 161.5%
1990 8,326 48.5%
2000 16,321 96.0%
2010 19,258 18.0%
source:[5][6]

As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 16,321 people, 9,149 households, and 5,434 families residing in the community. The population density was 1,303.0 people per square mile (502.9/km²). There were 10,500 housing units at an average density of 838.3/sq mi (323.5/km²). The racial makeup of the community was 98.96% White, 0.13% African American, 0.08% Native American, 0.40% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 0.14% from other races, and 0.21% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.19% of the population.

There were 9,149 households out of which 0.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.1% were married couples living together, 1.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.6% were non-families. 38.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 34.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.65 and the average family size was 2.05.

In the community the population was skewed toward the elderly with 0.4% under the age of 18, 0.2% from 18 to 24, 1.3% from 25 to 44, 15.1% from 45 to 64, and 83.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 75 years. For every 100 females there were 74.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 74.2 males.

Kings Point

Kings Point is an exclusive active adult community located in West Central Florida just 20 miles south of Tampa in Sun City Center, FL. Nestled between the bustling metropolis of Tampa Bay and the white sands of Sarasota’s beautiful area beaches, Sun City Center is an ideal place to retire. With over 5,250 homes, 63 holes of golf, 6 indoor and outdoor pools, tennis courts, and hundreds of unique social clubs, groups, organizations and classes, our community is a great place to really live. Entertainment, education, recreation and friendships are all found within the realm of our community. Kings Point continues to be one of the finest retirement communities in West Central Florida.

 

Ruskin, Florida

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Ruskin, Florida
CDP

Location in Hillsborough County and the state of Florida

Coordinates: 27°42′53″N 82°26′1″WCoordinates: 27°42′53″N 82°26′1″W
Country United States
State Florida
County Hillsborough
Area
 • Total 15.4 sq mi (40 km2)
 • Land 14.2 sq mi (36.9 km2)
 • Water 1.2 sq mi (3.1 km2)
Elevation 3 ft (1 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 17,208
 • Density 540.3/sq mi (208/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Area code(s) 813
FIPS code 12-62275[1]
GNIS feature ID 0290065[2]

Ruskin is an unincorporated census-designated place in Hillsborough County, Florida, United States. U.S. Route 41 currently runs through the center of the community. The town was founded August 7, 1908 on the shores of the Little Manatee River. It was developed by Dr. George McAnelly Miller, an attorney and professor at Ruskin College in Trenton, Missouri, and Mrs. Adaline D. Miller. It is named after the essayist and social critic John Ruskin (1819–1900). Miller established the short lived Ruskin College in Florida.

The town remained largely agricultural, including large tomato crops, until recent decades when it expanded with suburban housing developments. The population was 17,208 at the 2010 census.

Ruskin is home to Cockroach Bay Aquatic Preserve.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the community has a total area of 15.4 square miles (40 km2), of which, 14.2 square miles (37 km2) of it is land and 1.2 square miles (3.1 km2) of it (7.65%) is water.

History

Situated on the shores of the Little Manatee River, the town (founded on August 7, 1908) and college were named after the English writer and social reformist John Ruskin (1819–1900).

In 1907, Dr. George McAnelly Miller, a former Chicago prosecuting attorney and professor, and former president of Ruskin College in Trenton, Missouri, relocated his family to the area, and along with his brother-in-law Albert Peter Dickman’s family. They purchased land and started to set up homes, a saw mill, and a school. Mrs. Adaline D. Miller, (Dr. Miller’s wife) founded a post office on August 7, 1908. This day is recognized as the official founding day of the town. The Ruskin Commongood Society platted Ruskin on February 19, 1910, and filed the plat on March 9, 1910, in the Hillsborough County Court House with lots for the college, the business district, two parks, and for the founding families, with only Whites allowed to own or lease land in the community. Albert Dickman’s house, finished in 1910, on the banks of the Little Manatee River, is one of the few structures left standing from the founding of Ruskin.

The Millers began Ruskin College in 1910 with Dr. Miller serving as president and Adeline Miller serving as Vice President. Continuing with the college’s former practices, students worked a portion of each day as part of their education and as a way to pay for tuition and board. It offered three years of preparatory classes, students could then attend the college, taking classes in art, drama, language, literature, music, shorthand, social sciences, and speech. In 1913 the school has 160 students.

By 1913, the community had a cooperative general store, a canning factory, a telephone system, an electric plant supplying electricity to both public and private buildings, a weekly paper, and regular boat freight and passenger service to Tampa.

With the onset of World War I, most of students went to the war in Europe and the college closed its doors. In 1918, a fire destroyed the college, sparing only the Miller’s house. Dr. Miller died in August 1919.

At this time U.S. Route 41 was only a 9-foot-wide (2.7 m) shell road paid for by a $30,000 local bond issue. Because of the growing importance of truck farming, these roads and others were built to facilitate the transportation of produce to local markets throughout the 1920s. The railroad track connected Ruskin to the Seaboard Airline Railroad line in 1913. On the eve of the college’s demise in 1918, Ruskin had a population of 200 Ruskinites, as they are called. The majority of people appeared to have been truck growers. These residents supported a saw mill, a turpentine still, a syrup factory, a black smith, a newspaper, a lawyer, two carpenters, and three general stores. Rachel W. Billings served as postmaster and as the Universalist Reverend. With this foundation, it is not surprising that even with the destruction of the college the colony survived.

Dedication Plaque at Ruskin Post Office, 1962

In 1925, Ruskin’s population remained at 200. It had six hotels, two saw mills, one turpentine still, a public library, the Ruskin Telephone Company, four groceries, one garage, a well driller, two restaurants, a dry goods dealer, a carpenter, and a number of fruit and truck growers. Some of the fields have been cultivated and tomatoes, cabbages, onions and other crops are being raised. There is a nursery established for ornamentals on a favorable site, and in all probability it will become a pretentious place. Thousands of palms are ready for the demand of the markets and streets are being graded in certain portions of the town that lie off the highway….The social life of the town is commendable. The women have organized four or five clubs, ranging from the Woman’s Twentieth Century Club of the League of Women Voters. A new school was erected, as well as a church. With the road developments auto service was provided to Brandon, Tampa, and Wimauma.

In 1930 Ruskin’s population reached 709, consisting of 395 males and 314 females. Despite the deed restrictions against African Americans owning or leasing property, 140 Blacks resided in Ruskin. The rest of the population was White, of whom 514 were native and 52 were foreign born. Three companies operated in Ruskin in 1935 despite the Depression and a drop to 600 residents: Florida Power & Light Company; Ruskin Telephone, Electric Light and Power Company, Inc.; and Ruskin Trailer Company.

Because of its agricultural roots, the town weathered the depression. The soil of Ruskin farms is especially adapted to growing tomatoes. There is a large area of muck land under-laid with marl in this region. The marl base allows irrigation of crops without loss of fertilizer, as the marl prevents the fertilizer from washing too deep into the soil. Irrigation is no problem for Ruskin is favored with numerous artesian wells. Due to the rapid growth of tomato culture and a cooperative arrangement among Ruskin farmers, the town has taken a new lease on life and again is a thriving community. It has a canning plant which employs 65 workers, a community hall and a modern schoolhouse. As part of an attempt to attract visitors to Ruskin and to celebrate the area’s agricultural richness, the community instituted the annual springtime Ruskin Tomato Festival in 1935 where vegetables were displayed and the community’s most popular woman was voted as queen. This Festival still takes place every year in May.

With many Ruskin residents working in Tampa during World War II, people from Tampa began hearing of the benefits of the rural community. Shortly after the war, Ruskin slowly became more and more suburban as people not related to the agricultural business moved into the community.

In 1960, Ruskin was still very rural. Agriculture dominated Ruskin throughout the 1970s, but its influence began to wane. The greater Ruskin area’s population reached 17,000 by 1975, many of whom were not farmers, but suburbanites. By 1982, Ruskin produced approximately 3,000 acres (1,200 ha) of tomatoes a year, and one of the world’s largest tomato-packing houses operated in nearby Apollo Beach. However, flower farms, phosphate, real estate, and tropical fish farms also became important economic engines for Ruskin that began encroaching upon farmland. Despite this invasion, farmers grew approximately $15 million worth of produce yearly in the late 1980s.

Poor crop yields in the mid- to late 1980s drove some farmers to the wall. Many borrowed money, sometimes as much as $500,000, against their land to plant their crops. Consequently, many farmers were forced out of business, and others chose to leave farming forever. Due to the impact of the North American Free Trade Agreement in the 1990s which allowed Mexican tomatoes to flood the U.S. market and with ever increasing water restrictions, tomato acreage continued to decline. Less than half the number of acres planted with tomatoes in the early 1990s were planted in 1997. The housing boom of the first decade of the 21st century turned most of the tomato and orange plantations into new housing development, bringing thousand of new inhabitants to the area.

Despite the downfall of the housing market, Ruskin continues to grow. U.S. Route 41 is now a 4-lane road connecting Ruskin to Tampa, as does the interstate I-75 that has an exit at Ruskin. It had a very active Chamber of Commerce until 2011 when it merged with the Apollo Beach Chamber to become the South Shore Chamber of Commerce and moved from Ruskin to Apollo Beach.[3] Ruskin is the seat of the South Hillsborough County Government Center. It also has a branch of the Hillsborough County Public Library System. In 2009, the Dickman family donated the land where the new Ruskin Campus of the Hillsborough Community College was erected, across the street from the Earl J. Lennard High School.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1960 1,894
1970 2,414 27.5%
1980 5,117 112.0%
1990 6,046 18.2%
2000 8,321 37.6%
2010 17,208 106.8%
source:[4]

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 8,321 people, 2,963 households, and 2,074 families residing in the community. The population density was 584.4 people per square mile (225.6/km²). There were 3,603 housing units at an average density of 253.1/sq mi (97.7/km²). The racial makeup of the community was 80.69% White, 1.23% African American, 0.62% Native American, 0.43% Asian, 0.13% Pacific Islander, 14.85% from other races, and 2.04% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 36.73% of the population.

There were 2,963 households out of which 29.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.6% were married couples living together, 10.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.0% were non-families. 23.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.79 and the average family size was 3.28.

In the community the population was spread out with 26.5% under the age of 18, 9.6% from 18 to 24, 26.8% from 25 to 44, 21.1% from 45 to 64, and 16.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 104.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 102.9 males.

The median income for a household in the community was $28,228, and the median income for a family was $32,404. Males had a median income of $25,787 versus $20,817 for females. The per capita income for the community was $12,943. About 10.6% of families and 17.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.9% of those under age 18 and 11.7% of those age 65 or over.

Government

As of March 2006, the area collectively known as Ruskin remains as a part of unincorporated Hillsborough County. A movement towards incorporation began in late 2004 and early 2005 as mounting opposition to the amount of new developments within the community. Many longtime residents feel that the County Board of Commissioners has ignored repeated requests to slow down the development until proper infrastructure was in place. The Ruskin Incorporation Committee was formed to perform a study on whether it was feasible for the community to become a city in which it found it was. On January 19, 2006, HB 759 was filed with the Florida House of Representatives with all county representatives fully supporting the measure. If passed the question will be place on the ballots of the voters within Ruskin and the city would be officially incorporated on April 1, 2007 as a sovereign government. The Bill was not approved and it prevented Ruskin from becoming the first new city within the county in over 80 years. Ruskin is the seat of the South Hillsborough County Government Center and the Hillsborough Community College Ruskin Campus.

Amazon comes to Ruskin-2013

Gov. Rick Scott and Amazon announced a deal June 13, 2013 in which the Internet retail giant would create 3,000 new jobs in Florida by 2016 — with about a third of those likely headed for a 1-million-square-foot warehouse in Ruskin.[5]

Notable residents

National Historic Status and other Points of Interest

There are several locations in and near Ruskin some of which have been included in the National Register of Historic Places.

 

The median income for a household in the community was $38,101, and the median income for a family was $47,570. Males had a median income of $36,786 versus $27,963 for females. The per capita income for the community was $28,222. About 2.2% of families and 4.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 37.3% of those under age 18 and 3.9% of those age 65 or over.

Wimauma, Florida

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Wimauma, Florida
CDP

Location in Hillsborough County and the state of Florida

Coordinates: 27°42′35″N 82°19′4″WCoordinates: 27°42′35″N 82°19′4″W
Country United States
State Florida
County Hillsborough
Area
 • Total 8.8 sq mi (22.8 km2)
 • Land 8.4 sq mi (21.8 km2)
 • Water 0.4 sq mi (1 km2)
Elevation 102 ft (31 m)
Population (2000)
 • Total 4,246
 • Density 482.5/sq mi (186.2/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 33598
Area code(s) 813
FIPS code 12-78025[1]
GNIS feature ID 0293391[2]

Wimauma is an unincorporated census-designated place in Hillsborough County, Florida, United States. The population was 4,246 at the 2000 census.

History

Wimauma was founded by Captain C.H. Davis in 1902. That year, Davis helped build the Seaboard Air Line Railroad connecting Turkey Creek and Bradenton. Davis decided to found a town at the half-way point, opening a post office there in on October 24, 1902. Davis named the town by taking the first letters of the names of his three daughters, Willie, Maude, and Mary. The town had the railroad tracks as the eastern boundary and was centered around Lake Tiger, now called Lake Wimauma. The town was officially incorporated in 1925 as the county’s fourth municipality, but the city government ceased to function some time in the 1930s. In 1993 this fact was rediscovered, but it was concluded that the incorporation was no longer valid after about 60 years without a city government. Currently, Wimauma is the site of the Church Of God (Cleveland, TN) Camp Ground and conference center.

Geography

Wimauma is located at 27°42′35″N 82°19′4″W (27.709658, -82.317854)[3].

According to the United States Census Bureau, the community has a total area of 8.8 square miles (23 km2), of which, 8.4 square miles (22 km2) of it is land and 0.4 square miles (1.0 km2) of it (4.43%) is water.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 400
1940 557 39.3%
1950 440 −21.0%
1960 576 30.9%
1980 1,477
1990 2,932 98.5%
2000 4,246 44.8%
2010 6,373 50.1%
source:[4][5][6]

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 4,246 people, 951 households, and 820 families residing in the community. The population density was 504.1 people per square mile (194.7/km²). There were 1,097 housing units at an average density of 130.2/sq mi (50.3/km²). The racial makeup of the community was 51.13% White, 7.42% African American, 0.80% Native American, 0.21% Asian, 0.28% Pacific Islander, 37.21% from other races, and 2.94% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 72.89% of the population.

There were 951 households out of which 53.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.2% were married couples living together, 17.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 13.7% were non-families. 8.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 4.31 and the average family size was 4.36.

In the community the population was spread out with 38.6% under the age of 18, 14.2% from 18 to 24, 27.9% from 25 to 44, 13.6% from 45 to 64, and 5.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 24 years. For every 100 females there were 116.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 124.5 males.

The median income for a household in the community was $35,114, and the median income for a family was $34,671. Males had a median income of $20,484 versus $19,604 for females. The per capita income for the community was $8,597. About 26.5% of families and 31.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 44.5% of those under age 18 and 11.1% of those age 65 or over.

Notable people

Apollo Beach, Florida

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Apollo Beach, Florida
CDP

View of a Tampa Electric plant from Apollo Beach

Motto: Easley with an Ocean

Location in Hillsborough County and the state of Florida

Coordinates: 27°46′19″N 82°24′39″WCoordinates: 27°46′19″N 82°24′39″W
Country United States
State Florida
County Hillsborough
Area
 • Total 5.9 sq mi (15.3 km2)
 • Land 5.7 sq mi (14.7 km2)
 • Water 0.2 sq mi (0.6 km2)
Elevation 3 ft (1 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 14,055
 • Density 1,261.7/sq mi (486.5/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 33570, 33572
Area code(s) 813
FIPS code 12-01675[1]
GNIS feature ID 1867110[2]

 

Apollo Beach is an unincorporated census-designated place in Hillsborough County, Florida, United States. The population was 14,055 at the 2010 census.[3]

 

 

Geography

 

Apollo Beach is located at 27°46′19″N 82°24′39″W (27.771988, -82.410780)[4].

 

According to the United States Census Bureau, the community has a total area of 5.9 square miles (15 km2), of which 5.7 square miles (15 km2) is land and 0.2 square miles (0.52 km2) (3.56%) is water.

 

Demographics

 

Historical population
Census Pop.
1970 1,042
1980 4,014 285.2%
1990 6,025 50.1%
2000 7,444 23.6%
2010 14,055 88.8%
source:[5]

 

As of the 2010 census, there were 14,701 people in Apollo Beach and 5,886 households, an increase of nearly 75% in both categories over the 2000 census. New families came in with new construction, with the population of aged five years and under increasing by over 150%. The racial makeup of the community was 87% White, 6% African American, 0% Native American, 2% Asian, 3% from other races, and 2% from two or more races.

 

There were 5,886 households, of which 27% had children under the age of 18 living with them, and 63% were married couples living together, both higher than the state average.

 

History

 

The history of Apollo Beach started in 1923 on land owned by the Dickman family, then used annually for farming and grazing pasture. Much of the land was mangrove and low-elevation and was considered uninhabitable.

 

In the 1930s, Paul Dickman conceived the idea of a waterfront community. He felt the location was ideally located equidistant between Tampa and Bradenton along U.S. Route 41.

 

The Dickmans secured the services of an engineering firm in Miami, “Radar Engineering”, to design a subdivision including roads, canals, schools, recreation areas, and community services.

 

In the early 1950s, Dickman negotiated the sale of the land to three men from New York: Turner, Dean and Clark. They named the land “Tampa Beach”, believing the association with Tampa would attract interested persons more readily than a name which did not properly locate the area geographically.

 

Construction began on the Flamingo Canal near U.S. 41, and proceeded toward Fairway Boulevard. It was their intention to extend the canal to Tampa Bay so as to achieve access to open water. The task became too large for the amount of capital they had invested and for the abilities of the persons involved and in 1956 they notified Dickman they could not go through with the project.

 

In 1957, Francis Corr, a retired businessman from Michigan, purchased the land. Corr renamed the area La Vida Beach. Legend has it that in 1958 Corr’s wife Dorothy suggested a new name, Apollo Beach, for the area’s greatest benefit — sunshine.[6] Locals say the name was also inspired by the U.S. space program that was then developing in Florida. Mr. Corr started construction of 50 homes in the area between U.S. 41 and Golf & Sea Boulevard.

 

In early 1958, Corr reached an agreement with Robert E. Lee, a South Carolina contractor, to join in the development. Lee was to continue the dredging of canals and in exchange, was to receive parcels of land.

 

In the early 1960s, Francis Corr sold his company and the Apollo Beach land to a Miami company known as Flora Sun Corporation. Flora Sun sold some of the land on the northern end to Tampa Electric Company for a power plant site on the land’s northern border, which is now the Big Bend power plant. Flora Sun failed in its obligations in the purchase of the land from the Corr family and about seven years later the family got the land back out of bankruptcy court.

 

In the mid-1960s, Corr’s son, Thomas, moved his young family to the area to continue work on the Apollo Beach project; however, while the land was in bankruptcy proceedings from Flora Sun, the dredge and fill permits required to construct the canal system expired.

 

The Corr family continued to struggle with the development over the years, facing regulatory hurdles and tightening growth policy in Florida with the passage of the growth management act in 1972 and expanded policies in 1984.

 

Thomas Corr continued to develop the community and donated land for parks and schools and preserving hundreds of acres of mangrove swamps and environmental areas. He started a community bank, a chamber of commerce, civic clubs and festivals. Thomas Corr died in 1998.[7] In 2006, Hillsborough County honored the work of Thomas Corr by naming the new elementary school on Big Bend Road the Thomas P. Corr Elementary School.[8]

 

Today Apollo Beach is a thriving waterfront community with year-round boating, fishing, and other water activities. The estimated 55 miles of canals lead to Tampa Bay and the Gulf of Mexico via underpass of the Sunshine Skyway bridge.

 

Education

 

The schools that serve Apollo Beach are the following:

 

  • Apollo Beach Elementary
  • Eisenhower Middle School
  • East Bay High School

 

Notable people

 

  • Nick Carter, an American singer-songwriter, dancer, entertainer and actor. He is best known as one of the lead vocalists of the pop group, Backstreet Boys. grew up in Apollo Beach.[9]
  • Tessa Ludwick, an actress who attended first grade at Apollo Beach Elementary.[10]

 

Apollo Beach panoramic view

 

Gallery

 

 

Climate

 

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Apollo Beach has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated “Cfa” on climate maps. [12]

 

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Sun City Center Health and Wellness LLC
Dr. Eldridge McCormick, Amor Dougherty, Steve Collins, Edwin Uribe, Panyada Sachs, Angie Keys and Joshua Esprit
3040 E. College Ave
Ruskin, FL 33570
813-331-3940