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Family Medicine  (FM), formerly family practice (FP), is a medical specialty devoted to comprehensive health care for people of all ages; the specialist is named a family physicianfamily doctor, or formerly family practitioner. In Europe the discipline is often referred to as general practice and a practitioner as a General Practice Doctor orGP; this name emphasises the holistic nature of this speciality, as well as its roots in the family. It is a division of primary care that provides continuing and comprehensive health care for the individual and family across all ages, genders, diseases, and parts of the body.[1] It is based on knowledge of the patient in the context of the family and the community, emphasizing disease prevention and health promotion.[2] According to the World Organization of Family Doctors (Wonca), the aim of family medicine is to provide personal, comprehensive and continuing care for the individual in the context of the family and the community.[3] The issues of values underlying this practice are usually known as primary care ethics.

Acupunctureacupuncture imaage

Acupuncture is among the oldest healing practices in the world. In the United States, where practitioners incorporate healing traditions from China, Japan, Korea, and other countries, acupuncture is considered part of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM).

  • Acupuncture has been practiced in China and other Asian countries for thousands of years.
  • Scientists are studying the efficacy of acupuncture for a wide range of conditions.
  • Relatively few complications have been reported from the use of acupuncture.

The term “acupuncture” describes a family of procedures involving the stimulation of anatomical points on the body using a variety of techniques. The acupuncture technique that has been most often studied scientifically involves penetrating the skin with thin, solid, metallic needles that are manipulated by the hands or by electrical stimulation.

Practiced in China and other Asian countries for thousands of years, acupuncture is one of the key components of traditional Chinese medicine.  Acupuncture became better known in the United States in 1971, when New York Times reporter James Reston wrote about how doctors in China used needles to ease his pain after surgery. American practices of acupuncture incorporate medical traditions from China, Japan, Korea, and other countries.

The report from a Consensus Development Conference on Acupuncture held at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 1997 stated that acupuncture is being “widely” practiced—by thousands of physicians, dentists, acupuncturists, and other practitioners—for relief or prevention of pain and for various other health conditions. According to the 2007 National Health Interview Survey, which included a comprehensive survey of CAM use by Americans, an estimated 3.1 million U.S. adults and 150,000 children had used acupuncture in the previous year. Between the 2002 and 2007 NHIS, acupuncture use among adults increased by approximately 1 million people.

 Acupressure290px-Acupuncture_point_Hegu_(LI_4)

[from Latin acus “needle” (see acuity) + pressure (n.).] is an alternative medicine technique similar in principle to Acupuncture. It is based on the concept of life energy which flows through “meridians” in the body. In treatment, physical pressure is applied to trigger points with the aim of clearing blockages in these meridians. Pressure may be applied by hand, by elbow, or with various devices.

Some medical studies have shown that acupressure is effective at helping manage nausea and vomiting, or for helping lower back pain.

Tuina  tuina

Tui na or tuina, is a form of Chinese manipulative therapy often used in conjunction with acupuncture, moxibustion and fire cupping. Chinese Tui na is a hands-on body treatment that uses Chinese martial arts principles in an effort to bring the eight principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) into balance. The practitioner may brush, knead, roll/press, and rub the areas between each of the joints, known as the eight gates, to attempt to open the body’s defensive (wei) chi and get the energy moving in the meridians and the muscles. The practitioner can then use range of motion, traction, and massage, with the stimulation of acupressure points. These techniques are claimed to aid in the treatment of both acute and chronic musculoskeletal conditions, as well as many non-musculoskeletal conditions.[4] Tui na is an integral part of TCM and is taught in TCM schools as part of formal training in Oriental medicine. Many East Asian martial arts schools also teach Tui na to their advanced students for the treatment and management of injury and pain due to training. As with many other traditional Chinese medical practices, there are several different schools with greater or smaller differences in their approach to the discipline. It is related also to Japanese massage or anma ().

In ancient China, medical therapy was often classified as either “external” or “internal” treatment. Tui na was considered to be one of the external methods, thought to be especially suitable for use on the elderly population and on infants.

Moxabustion or Moxa

230px-A_Dose_of_Moxa

Moxibustion  is a traditional Chinese medicine therapy using moxa made from dried mugwort. It plays an important role in the traditional medical systems of China , Japan, Korea, Vietnam, and Mongolia. Suppliers usually age the mugwort and grind it up to a fluff; practitioners burn the fluff or process it further into a cigar-shaped stick. They can use it indirectly, with acupuncture needles, or burn it on the patient’s skin.

Practitioners use moxa to warm regions and acupuncture points with the intention of stimulating circulation through the points and inducing a smoother flow of blood and qi. It is believed by some that mugwort acts as an emmenagogue, meaning that it stimulates blood-flow in the pelvic area and uterus. It is claimed that moxibustion militates against cold and dampness in the body, and can serve to turn breech babies.

Practitioners claim moxibustion to be especially effective in the treatment of chronic problems, “deficient conditions” (weakness), and gerontology. Bian Que (fl. circa 500 BCE), one of the most famous semi-legendary doctors of Chinese antiquity and the first specialist in moxibustion, discussed the benefits of moxa over acupuncture in his classic work. He asserted that moxa could add new energy to the body and could treat both excess and deficient conditions.

There are several methods of moxibustion.   Indirect moxibustion holds a cigar made of mugwort near the acupuncture point to heat the skin, or holds it on an acupuncture needle inserted in the skin to heat the needle.

In traditional Chinese medicine there is a belief that moxibustion of mugwort is effective at increasing the cephalic positioning of fetuses who were in a breech position before the intervention. A 2012 Cochrane review stated that there is  “evidence” that moxibustion may be useful for reducing the need for external cephalic version.

CUPPING

CUPPING

There is reason to believe the practice dates from as early as 3000 B.C.; the earliest record of cupping is in the Ebers Papyrus, one of the oldest medical textbooks in the world, describes in 1550 B.C. Egyptians used cupping. Archaeologists have found evidence in China of cupping dating back to 1000 B.C. In ancient Greece, Hippocrates (c. 400 B.C.) used cupping for internal disease and structural problems. This method in multiple forms spread into medicine throughout Asian and European civilizations

According to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) cupping is a method of creating a vacuum on the patient’s skin to dispel stagnation — stagnant blood and lymph, thereby improving qi flow — to treat respiratory diseases such as the common cold, pneumonia and bronchitis. Cupping also is used on back, neck, shoulder and other musculoskeletal conditions. Its advocates say it has other applications, as well.

Laserslaser therapy

Biologically, the laser bio-stimulation will increase the cell production in connective, tendonous, and cartilaginous tissue. This results in increased collagen production. Research demonstrates that the laser affects the mitochondria thereby enhancing the production and synthesis of ATP (Adenosine Triphosphate) and optimizes oxygenation and phagocytes.

The healing process increases the tensile strength of healed tissue, reduces swelling, increases blood flow, increases lymphatic activity, reduces inflammation and increases cellular metabolism and speeds the repair process. The results are accumulative.

 4 Distinct Effects

  1. Growth factor response within cells and tissues.
  2. Pain relief as a result of increased endorphin and serotonin release.
  3. Increased lymphatic activity and strengthening of the immune system response.
  4. Stimulation of acupuncture points, increased collagen and ATP production, increased circulation. Treatment is non-destructive, safe, and painless. The more you use it, the more effective the results.

POINT INJECTIONINJECTION

Florida Statute 457, and Rule Chapter 64B1 states:

Effective March 1, 2002, adjunctive therapies shall include acupoint injection therapy which shall mean the injection of herbs, homeopathics, and other nutritional supplements in the form of sterile substances into acupuncture points by means of hypodermic needles but not intravenous therapy to promote, maintain, and restore health; for pain management and palliative care; for acupuncture anesthesia; and to prevent disease. 

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Sun City Center Health and Wellness LLC
Dr. Eldridge McCormick, Amor Dougherty, Steve Collins, Edwin Uribe, Panyada Sachs, Angie Keys and Joshua Esprit
3040 E. College Ave
Ruskin, FL 33570
813-331-3940